Analysis of Me Before You: Chp. 4

cripplebingo

[Image description: A bingo card entitled “Cripple Trope Bingo” with boxes filled with the following from the top left corner to right and then down each row: “Dumped after disability”, “Disability as excuse for jerkassery”, “ablesplaining”, “Caregiver uncomfortable with tasks”, Free space, “Disability is miserable with no regard of ableism”, “ableist speculation”, “Disabled person pushes away friends because of shame”, and finally “The disabled don’t have sex”.]

Moyes was trying very hard to fill out her “Cripple Trope” bingo card with this chapter. I want to say it’s impossible that she could jampack another chapter with so many clichés, but I may be surprised.

This review is very long. It’s over 2,700 words because Chapter Four was long with a lot to unpack.

Again, if you’re new please check out the intro and check out the tag for earlier installments.

Trigger warning: towards the end of this review (it’s marked there too) there is a very upsetting conversation about wishing to die over being disabled.

Chapter Four starts off with a description of Lou and Will falling into a routine as two weeks have passed since the last chapter. Except even after all this time Lou is still an ableist asshat.

Continue reading

Advertisements

The Kelpie

627px-Deirdrê,_A_Book_of_Myths

[Image description: Deirdre, a young woman with red hair, sits crouched on a moor. In her lap is the head of Naoise, a young man she loved.]

A young man walks by the stream

In his head a thousand burgeoning dreams

His crutches beat a tattoo against the packed clay

Laid down over millions of days

The water murmurs in refrain

Of the dragging toes of his right leg

Selene watches with a passive face

Her burning companions beaded into dark lace

 

She comes before him from out of the emptiness

That exists in the trembling of cruelness

A bitter filly, one of the Unseelie

Called waterhorse or kelpie

A tall lass with weeded hair

Her toothy grin holds despair

In every space between her great fangs

 

He shudders to see her

Yet bites upon her lure

Of devouring caprice

She draws him near

Her breath heavy with moss, blood, and fear.

“I don’t make it with prostitutes.”

She tells him his observation isn’t astute.

 

Her laugh is a thousand silver bells

A glided death knell

As hoary hands crush his throat

She knows her killing method by rote

She drowns him in the stream

His last requiem on Earth is his scream

Analysis of Me Before You: Chp. 3

young man in a wheelchair is angry

[Image description: young man in a wheelchair in front of white background flipping off the viewer with both hands with his back turned]

Chapter Three is mercifully short. I wonder why it and Chapter Two were not just merged together but I guess it’s important every chapter end with Lou’s family having dinner together. Chapter Four is fairly long however with a lot to unpack so it will take me longer to tackle that one.

If you’re new please consult my intro and you can look at this tag for earlier installments.

Chapter Three begins with Mrs. Traynor leading Lou to the annex Will now lives in. Having everything on one floor would be more convenient for a quadriplegic as Mrs. Traynor claims but I wonder if being excluded from family meals and other minutia of family life just worsens Will’s mental health. (Later on we see Mrs. Traynor’s difficulty with being around her son as he now is.)

And we finally get to meet Will in this chapter. He’s as charming as you’d expect. When we meet him his nurse Nathan is just finishing dressing him. To secure Lou’s affections Will begins to imitate Big Foot’s lustful growls.

Continue reading

Analysis of MBY: Chapter Two

Or everyone in this is an ableist asshat.

asshat

[Image description: A person in a suit with their body bent to literally stick their head up their ass.]

[Trigger warning: I could be this on the entire series really as Me Before You is a hot ableist mess but in particular I will talk about suicide in this installment. Tread carefully.]

In light of what happened in Orlando, I’ve decided in this installment I will address why Me Before You is a disingenuous portrayal of disability in terms of representation (also). I believe representation is the greatest way to fight bigotry. Despite all the strides forward we’ve made there is still a deep-rooted fear of homosexuality in my country and many countries. We need more visibility if we are to ever overcome.

And that includes portraying disabled queer people and disabled people of color who are queer or not.

Continue reading

Analysis of MBY: Chapter One

Red-Flage-Warning

[Image description: A picture of a waving red flag with the text over it:Red Flag Warning Issued]

This entire chapter was pretty much red flag after red flag.

Thank god these chapters are so short, because my energy is limited. I can’t guarantee any sort of schedule however because of my health. I have good days and bad days, and good weeks and bad weeks. Unfortunately you’ll just have to keep tuning back in to see when I post updates. You can follow my twitter or tumblr too for updates. (/plug)

If you’re new please consult my intro.

The first chapter starts two years after the prologue and focuses on Lou, the female lead. It takes the book six pages to say what I can in one sentence: Lou lost her job at a café that she really enjoyed working at because the owner sold it. There, and no need for a two page interlude re-playing the lay-off for no needed reason. This book is already 405 pages in my edition, why is there so much superfluous information? There was clearly no need to pad the word count.

Nevertheless the point of this review is to address the ableism, not my armchair editing (I am literally sitting in an armchair; it’s the only kind of chair I can really sit comfortably in). Apparently Lou’s grandfather lives with the family and appears to have dementia though it hasn’t been said yet (and may never be) why he exactly needs care. He doesn’t appear verbal and apparently needs Lou’s mother to care for him. The family is apparently treading water financially so Lou losing her job does have a significant economic consequence.

So you think she be a little bit more cooperative with the job center.

Continue reading

Analysis of MBY: Intro + Prologue

059f38a0-b3b6-0133-b37e-0e438b3b98d1 (1)

[Image description: Cover of “Me Before You”; movie tie-in edition. It features Lou sitting in Will’s lap.]

As the prologue of the book is so short (in my edition it’s not even four pages) I decided I would use this first post to also introduce myself and my motivations for this analysis.

First, I am physically disabled and neurodivergent. When I was still in highschool I was diagnosed with clinical depression and had suicide idealization. I was eventually stabilized though I still had anxiety and I also developed a proclivity for sleep paralysis and auditory hallucinations in my mid-twenties. Recently I’ve gone back into counseling for depression with the stress of my chronic illness.

My physical disability started when about fifteen months ago with a simple backache. I have desiccated disc disease and I am being investigated for Multiple Sclerosis and Fibromyalgia. My right leg is perpetually numb and I have terrible, terrible chronic back pain. I also have balance issues, general malaise, and chronic exhaustion. Because of all of the above I use a wheelchair and cane to get around.

In short I am somewhat similar to Will, the male lead in “Me Before You”. I’m not quadriplegic and for now I can perform all my basic care by myself. Nevertheless I do use a wheelchair and I have had suicide idealization. I also know very well what it feels like to have your will ground down by ableism and an inaccessible world.

Continue reading