Allyship is not mere “tolerance”.

Or, “sorry no cookies for you, insincere able-person.”

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[Image description: A pink “your ecards” that depicts a black and white drawing of a man and a woman standing side by side on the right hand side. On the left black text reads: “P.S. I’ll tolerate you”.]

I paid $26 to renew this domain so I may as well use it to vent my spleen (because why else do we blog?).

My ire this morning was drawn to this article. The tl;dr version is “Professor condescend to a student asking for accommodations so hard she scares the student from ever contacting her again. She takes this as a victory for some reason.”

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[Image description: A gif of Jim Carrey in “Liar Liar” slamming his head on a desk in a courtroom as his stunned client sits next to him.]

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Ableism on the Left

This incident got me banned from Salman Rushdie’s twitter. Yes, that Salman Rushdie.

https://twitter.com/sieistschoen/status/765737071436713984

Paginated Thoughts

Here’s some things that highlight for you that ableism is not just a right-wing issue:

My friend got called the r-slur for being an ally to the mental health community and penning an opinion piece on “Stop calling Trump crazy.” The sad and terrible irony is so great I don’t know where to start. Perry noted that people attacked him “who, in theory, are on my side in many issues.” Theoretically, people on the left and people who call themselves progressive Democrats are against ableism and bigotry. Bernie Sanders said Republicans were the reason we needed mental health care as a “joke” in one of the Democratic debates. The audience laughed. But wrong does not mean crazy.

Salman Rushdie, who supported President Obama’s election and has criticized Republicans before, stated the following in an August 12 Tweet: “No, I’m backing the non-insane candidate. And Flann O’Brien would be…

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Analysis of Me Before You: Chp. 3

young man in a wheelchair is angry

[Image description: young man in a wheelchair in front of white background flipping off the viewer with both hands with his back turned]

Chapter Three is mercifully short. I wonder why it and Chapter Two were not just merged together but I guess it’s important every chapter end with Lou’s family having dinner together. Chapter Four is fairly long however with a lot to unpack so it will take me longer to tackle that one.

If you’re new please consult my intro and you can look at this tag for earlier installments.

Chapter Three begins with Mrs. Traynor leading Lou to the annex Will now lives in. Having everything on one floor would be more convenient for a quadriplegic as Mrs. Traynor claims but I wonder if being excluded from family meals and other minutia of family life just worsens Will’s mental health. (Later on we see Mrs. Traynor’s difficulty with being around her son as he now is.)

And we finally get to meet Will in this chapter. He’s as charming as you’d expect. When we meet him his nurse Nathan is just finishing dressing him. To secure Lou’s affections Will begins to imitate Big Foot’s lustful growls.

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